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Who is The Better Driver? Men vs. Women

Discussion in 'General Automobile Discussion' started by Shadowhunter, May 12, 2015.

  1. Shadowhunter

    Shadowhunter Active Member

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    We've all seen our fair share of accidents, regardless of which gender was at the wheel. But who do you think is the better driver: men or women?

    [​IMG]


    Through our own experiences, perceptions, and influences our brains decide who we view as the better driver. For many of us, as is displayed in many TV Shows and Movies, men remain the better, dominant, confident driver.

    "Women drivers" is commonly used as a negative term by both men and women worldwide.

    How did she get in an accident? Is that a woman causing a traffic jam? "Must be a woman driving eh!" We hear this so often, and by so many people that it is ingrained in us to expect women to be bad drivers, or at least, not as good as men. We are shocked when we see viral youtube videos of stunt women drifting, racing, and skillfully terrifying and/or thrilling their passengers with their impressive moves. "Wheyyy that's a woman?! How?!"

    Let's flip the coin. How did he get in an accident? Is he causing a traffic jam? "He was or must have been speeding/sleeping/car malfunctioned/got bad drive/was driving like an @$$." Look at that skilled stunt man in that video. "Wheyyyy he dread! He good yes. Check them skills!"


    Let's try it again.

    • How did he get in an accident? "Must be a man driving eh!" Look at that skilled stunt man in that video. "Wheyyyy that's a man?! How?!"
    • How did she get in an accident? "She was or must have been speeding/sleeping/car malfunctioned/got bad drive/was driving like an @$$." Look at that skilled stunt woman in that video. "Wheyyyy she dread! She good yes. Check them skills!"

    Weird huh? I have to admit, I made a typo on the last one and originally wrote "stunt man" instead of "stunt woman" while thinking about the responses I was writing to the driver. Funny how the brain works!

    [​IMG]


    I'm not saying everyone thinks this way, but I have noticed that this is a very common mentality in society.

    To get to the root of the bad rep female drivers have, I think most complaints are usually with minor accidents or exhibits of poor driving skills. These are usually called out with "go back and learn to drive nah gyul" etc. Prime examples are women being afraid to drive through two rows of vehicles, especially on narrow roads; women afraid of overtaking or of being overtaken; women afraid of the highway or driving on busy roads or in traffic; women parking improperly or not using their signals, etc. Many of these problems could be due to a lack of confidence, inadequate driving experience on the road, not enough experience despite the driving exam, and/or just fear of being a "woman driver" on the road when she may be judged by her sex just by sitting in the car. Confidence and practice could help a lot there, but I suppose negative stereotypes may not be as helpful as we think.

    [​IMG]


    When we hear about speeding, DUIs, and road rage most people assume the driver is male, however. Conversely to the unconfident and inexperienced stereotypical female driver, are we stereotyping men as overconfident and aggressive?


    [​IMG]

    From my experience, it is much more likely to hear of men driving underage and being taught to drive years before they approach the legal permit age. According to many statistics reports, men typically have more miles clocked, and percentages are significantly higher for male drivers when it comes to speeding and DUIs. It is common for women to be taught by their spouses, relatives, friends, or driving instructors at or after the legal permit age. Does more experience lead the majority of males to be overconfident or is this just what many of us subconsciously believe?


    Though this does not by any means apply to every driver, based on common mentalities it would seem that society generally believes so. There are indeed star drivers regardless of gender just as well as there are poor ones. But we acknowledge the term "women drivers" negatively and the term "men drivers" well - it doesn't have quite the same effect, does it? Not all inexperienced drivers are women, and not all aggressive drivers are men.

    From my own experience, I've noticed that men are more confident on the road and this usually comes from many years of experience (as many of them have stated). Most male drivers insist that they must be driving when in a car with other drivers, and in many cases, female drivers concede to this and revert to passenger status, losing out on more valuable driving experience. Many men are so insistent of this that they may exhibit signs of physical illness when reverted to a passenger status themselves. Others are teased for mashing invisible pedals from the passenger side and/or being too forceful or controlling of any other person driving but themselves (i.e. backseat driving), in addition to popularizing "passenger road rage". I've also noticed that male drivers are more prone to aggressive behavior, such as road rage, whether it is verbally abusing other drivers or intentionally giving someone a "bad drive" to teach them a lesson. This can cause accidents, traffic jams, and seriously annoy and irritate other drivers.

    [​IMG]


    I've noticed that female drivers are more reluctant to exhibit typical signs of road rage and though many lack the experience and confidence of a stereotypical male driver, most female drivers use these qualities (or lack thereof) to either avoid imposing their vehicles on the road, or superimpose themselves inappropriately. Either extreme can cause traffic jams, accidents, and seriously annoy and irritate other drivers. Many consider themselves not experienced enough to drive with a male driver present and despite having licenses or years of experience, will ask or allow an insisting male driver to take their place at the wheel if driving together, losing valuable driving experience and conditioning themselves to passenger status or a secondary driver.

    [​IMG]


    Despite what we say and think as a society, female drivers receive insurance discounts because they are statistically considered safer drivers. One local insurance company told me that if an accident occurs with a female driver, it is more likely that someone else instigated the accident and/or that it will be a minor accident with little to no real damage i.e. there is a lesser chance of female drivers needing to make claims in comparison to the expected more serious accidents and resultant claims of male drivers based on statistics. Additionally, we advertise vehicles as lady driven as a positive point when attempting to buy/sell vehicles. I have been told by those that buy/sell that this is because lady driven vehicles are expected to be kept in better condition and are not as expected to have been in an accident.

    Double standards much?


    It does not matter what your gender is or how you identify sexually. If you are an inexperienced driver with little to no confidence, what you have in your pants will not change that. Ditto for overconfident aggressive drivers. What makes a good driver, regardless of who you are or what you look like, is the amount of practice and experience you have, equipped with common courtesy, quick and sound judgement, and fair amounts of confidence needed for operating heavy machinery in public where you risk not only your own life, but those of countless others as well. Each car you see on the road, each pedestrian you see at the crosswalk, each animal you see roaming the streets; even if you only pass them for a brief second as unimportant blurs in your busy day, are all lives in your hands when you choose to get behind the wheel. They are lives that deserve experienced, courteous, just drivers of vehicles that can too easily become weapons in inadequate hands.


    [​IMG]


    To answer my question of who is the better driver, here is my checklist:
    • well practiced
    • experienced on the roads with real life scenarios
    • experienced with the vehicle they are driving
    • experienced with safe driving practices in motion or not
    • common courtesy
    • quick and sound judgement
    • fair amounts of confidence
    • being legally allowed to drive the vehicle they are operating

    The driver that can check off all of those things is the best and most adequately prepared to get behind the wheel, whether male or female. Driving, as with everything else, is something that has to be learned. If you are lacking in experience, practice more driving and familiarizing yourself with your vehicle and the roadways. If you are an aggressive driver, practice common courtesy and familiarize yourself with safe driving practices. More practice and regular reality checks can help a great deal of "bad" drivers, especially with regards to preparedness in dangerous situations.



    At the end of the day, these are my personal views based on my own experiences and perceptions. What are yours?
     
    #1 Shadowhunter, May 12, 2015
    Last edited: May 12, 2015
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  3. Shadowhunter

    Shadowhunter Active Member

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    Legit statistics:


    • "Seventy-one percent of all motor vehicle crash deaths in 2013 were males. Males accounted for 70 percent of passenger vehicle driver deaths, 51 percent of passenger vehicle passenger deaths, 99 percent of large truck driver deaths, 71 percent of large truck passenger deaths, 69 percent of pedestrian deaths, 87 percent of bicyclist deaths, and 91 percent of motorcyclist deaths."

    • "Men typically drive more miles than women and more often engage in risky driving practices including not using safety belts, driving while impaired by alcohol, and speeding. Crashes involving male drivers often are more severe than those involving female drivers"
    [Insurance Institute for Highway Safety]



    • "Data from black box recorders in the vehicles of 19,000 motorists found women drivers were 12 per cent less likely to exceed speed limits than men, and 11 per cent less likely to brake hard – which marked them out as smoother and more safety conscious."
    [Wunelli]



    • "Data from various sources...found that 57 per cent of male drivers have been involved in a crash, compared to 44 per cent of women; 46 per cent of men had what was described as a ‘close call’ with a cyclist or pedestrian, compared to 35 per cent of women; and 68 per cent of UK women have a clean driving licence, against 64 per cent of men."
    [Jennings Motor Group]




    • "Based on data from the Driving Standards Agency on practical driving test pass rates from 2011 to 2013 – nearly half of male motorists (48 per cent) passed their test [the] first time, with 44 per cent of female drivers passing at the first attempt. The same research also found women take an average of eight months to pass their practical driving test – two months more than men, who qualified after six."
    [Confused.com (Insurance comparison website)]



    • "[About] twice as many reverse parking errors were made by female motorists on driving tests, in comparison to their male counterparts – 3,367 mistakes against 1,652."
    [Freedom of Information request (UK)]




    • "More statistics show men in a poorer light when it comes to losing concentration behind the wheel by adjusting their stereo or using their mobile phone, or speeding and verbally abusing other drivers, plus their involvement in traffic collisions or crashes with animals."
    [Autoexpress.co.uk]





    • "Men broke more traffic laws and drove more recklessly, as well as caused more accidents and had more damages done to their vehicles. Men were more likely to get speeding tickets, as well as being ticked for reckless driving, not wearing a seatbelt, DUI and breaking laws for passing and knowing when to yield."
    [Quality Planning (analytics company)]



    • "Men learning to drive were much more overconfident than female student drivers and were more likely to tell someone they knew what they were doing in a driving situation even if they didn’t."
    [Sharkey’s Auto Driving School]



    • "Between March 2001 and 2002, at least double the amount of males between 16 and 19 were involved in an accident than females of the same age. The same was true for several other age categories from men aged 20 through 70 years old, in every case there were at least twice as many males involved in crashes than women."
    • "In 2009 nearly 12,000 men died due to traffic accidents compared to less 5,000 women. If you add to the facts males and females aged 16 to 19 years, then the numbers showed that nearly 10 boys died versus only five girls per every 100 million miles of driving."
    • "A five year study in New York showed that 80 percent of all car accidents in which pedestrians were either killed or hurt badly were caused by male drivers. Aggressive driving was seen as a main cause of many of the reported accidents. According to the survey, a lot of the male drivers believed that being aggressive was a good thing when they were driving."
    • "A study in 2006 showed that nearly 97 percent of the driving violations and nearly 94 percent of vehicle accidents where there was a death involved men drivers. Plus, this survey showed that men were nine times more likely to be the guilty parties in violating some sort of traffic rule or regulation."
    • "A Napier University expert in transportation psychology in Edinburgh reported that men perform more risky behavior than women. Plus, men were usually seen to have more powerful vehicles than most women and when that is combined with a tendency for speeding, it equals more accidents as well. Even when women were in accidents, their accidents happened at slower speeds than those committed by males, so the results equaled less serious accidents in most cases."
    • "Studies show that men take more risks, drive speedier, tailgate more often, wear seat belts less often, drink and drive more often, and even park quicker and with less thought towards the other vehicles in the parking lot. However, the study did show that the faster parking men were able to park a lot more accurately. This shows they have more technical abilities, but some studies show that this fact causes them to get too cocky when it comes to rating their own driving abilities."
    [Vehicleinsure.com]



    • "Women order safety options on their cars at a much higher rate than men."
    [Ford spokesperson]
     
  4. grimreaper009

    grimreaper009 Moderator
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    Grabs Popcorn and awaits the comments on how they guys going and defend themselves from proven stats
     
  5. nirtime

    nirtime Active Member

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    Not going to read this thread with any bias in mind.

    Here is the simple fact: Driving isnt gender based. Its personality based. I do not agree with which gender is the better driver, I think in all honesty such a thing is ridiculous.

    In both genders there are terrible drivers and then good drivers. Proven stats or what there is the % not included.

    Also I learned to drive at the legal age and since racking up only about 8-10,000km im yet to find experience a problem in bad drives ive gotten vs intentionally doing the wrong thing. In other words cell phone and long talk is what causes people more distraction than experience and inability.

    I also dont agree with the stats, I failed my driving test the first time while several other females passed on the same day, more than the males. Unless anyone has proof of sample size and methodology I will not take the stats seriously because most times ive passed by my local driving test area there are more females than males and more of them pass the test than males.
    Its easy to believe what the stats says but lets remember there is the possibility in the sample size there were more men than women hence the reason more men passed first time.

    Further ive gotten my share of extreme aggression equally from both genders on the road with the older ones being the most aggressive/ wanting to cause an accident when they see a young male driver in a very well kept vehicle.

    Also call out that revert to passenger status. During a work week who drives themselves in the tight parking and traffic, not the women themselves? One or three hours isnt a lot of experience to miss, I never believed in experience but rather technique because of how our driving habits are here, its enough to cause accidents with experienced ppl who aren't from here. In the same way males when asked have the experience from long time, same way do females and there are a lot of females who will stop men in their tracks trying to give them a bad drive.

    Its just when a lot of these shallow brain men see a woman they feel superior and most times than not some of the females I know have gotten their bad drives from gender discrimination.

    Some men do suffer from some type of mental issue where they cannot be a passenger. They have to always be the driver and thats a bit unrealistic to say the least.

    A lot of these bad drivers cannot be helped. Ive tested this myself and usually there is no reaction as it was clear they did not understand or chose to blow their horn in response to yours. A lot of people driving pick ups lose control because they drive too quickly around corners. It has been my experience this week alone where two males driving pick ups have headed straight for me. One was a mistaken case of speed the other was purely a highly aggressive reaction to seeing a young driver behind the wheel... Little did he realise this young driver would not divert or brake but merely point to his side of the road.

    Lastly has anybody noticed a bright lights flash or three is far more effective than a horn these days?
     
    #4 nirtime, May 12, 2015
    Last edited: May 12, 2015
  6. grimreaper009

    grimreaper009 Moderator
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    technique comes with experience.....so without experience you won't be able to survive on the road and at 10000 km you still have a lot to experience
     
  7. nirtime

    nirtime Active Member

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    That is my point. I barely have any experience and I have no trouble doing what im supposed to do. Yet people driving years on years simply do not/cannot do what is required. See what I mean?
     
  8. nirtime

    nirtime Active Member

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    to touch on the fear point in the Op, once an individual has become acquainted with a vehicle and the road for a period of time to make themselves affiliated with the way it works, theres not much reason why they should still be having major difficulty in driving on their side of the road to say the least. So in relation to women, I dont know if fear is a problem but isolate discrimination for a second, there isnt much reason why anybody would be so afraid given enough driving around familiar roads.

    In my personal experience I was one of the better driving students but the roughness of the officer caused me issues and after getting my license, having people tell me what to do caused me tremendous problems. once people were kept out of the car and I was alone I had very few problems and thats when I really began to catch it. I think for most people it works that way as well.

    I have very little experience compared to most people but ive never once had a problem driving alone. I get the most bad drive out of everyone I know and im still here with a factory assembled vehicle.
    So to tell me people with donkey years behind a wheel doing crap and cant even drive an Xtrail on their side of a road is really ridiculous IMHO.
     
  9. grimreaper009

    grimreaper009 Moderator
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    to some is a nerve racking experience and it was how they were thought also.....lol just because its a van factory or not factory doesnt mean anything i have a padna with rock crawelers and he gets bad drive from people alot still...its all about knowing your vehicle lol width etc..lol and you still young on the road there will be times when you will have to pull on being a experience driver to save your @ss
     
  10. nirtime

    nirtime Active Member

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    has nothing to do with vehicle. Used it to make the point it doesn't take 100 years to drive properly without getting in accidents.

    You should have seen the kind of drives I get already, I almost lost my life twice. If I didnt use my sense id be dead, thats all im trying to say. Yea experience is needed but its not the be all end all, young drivers have their share too and the point im making is that 1 month or 100 years, there are ppl who make it through their lives at the start without experience and survive to gather the experience. If I didnt use technique id not be here right now, my body would be severed from impact and id be dead. The road does not have room for I didnt know I don't have experience, in that way ppl have to adapt to survive thats what im saying.

    Experience is what you gather over time assuming youre smart enough to employ a technique that gets you through Trinidad Roads.

    Think about this: you dont have experience youre a new driver. You follow a truck very closely , exceed the speed limit then the truck slams his brakes and you run under his tires. Youre dead without a second thought. Theres no room there to say well I young and dont have experience. That is where a technique comes into play from observation or whatever to realise from general knowledge that keeping a distance behind the truck would save a life.
     
    #9 nirtime, May 12, 2015
    Last edited: May 12, 2015
  11. nirtime

    nirtime Active Member

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    It also matters how a person was thought as you rightly said. I failed my test due to learning to straighten the car using mirrors, while the officer required students to look out the back.

    Some people are thought under nervousness as in they get their license but the people they drive with always jump or get frighten whenever the new driver makes a move. That can really scare someone and I see how it could affect people badly.
     
  12. Shadowhunter

    Shadowhunter Active Member

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    I agree that technique is extremely important. I also believe it is just as important to have experience behind the wheel. In order for a person to get their license, they are supposed to be knowledgeable about basic driving laws at the very least and through practice and experience, should have learned how to maneuver a vehicle through different roadway situations i.e. very important and non-negotiable skills. This however, is not usually the case. Many people are paying for licenses they are not qualified for and this puts us all at risk on the road.

    For you to be a skilled driver with minimal years under your belt proves how seriously you take the privilege of driving and the safety factors as well. Well deserved props there, as many people take this for granted and drive recklessly, falsely assuming that they will know what to do in every situation because they can turn a key and/or passed some change for a license.

    I should clarify what I mean by experience though. I'm not saying that simply having a greater number of years under your belt makes someone a better driver. I'm saying there are a lot of factors as I listed above. Experience isn't just number of years, but how well you've learned to handle the vehicle under different roadway conditions and in different situations. Eg. You can be a pro driving on smooth highway road under clear skies for 5-10 years but catch your royal @$$ trying to drive through some of the poor excuses for "roads" here in South, especially during poor weather conditions leading to road problems like landslips and flooding. The person not experienced with the latter situation may be perceived as a poor driver or nuisance on the road, when in fact, they just do not have the experience with those particular variables involved.

    Many people that travel and drive in other countries will also tell you that no matter how seasoned they are as a driver, despite all their skills and techniques, it takes a while to adapt to new situations. Some adapt faster than others. It doesn't mean others are bad drivers by any means. With experience driving under new conditions such as roads, etc. they will learn. New drivers often don't know the roads as well as seasoned drivers. Even drivers that rank on pro levels may lack a little confidence somewhere they aren't familiar with enough to maneuver safely and confidently through. More experience/practice driving through those areas may get them there.

    When I was learning to drive, I practiced on certain roads throughout the country, repeatedly. I was not a pro by any means, but the experience I got with that repetition made me more skilled on those roads I learned like the back of my hand while I watched licensed drivers with decades of experience struggle to follow me through areas they weren't as familiar with or through road conditions they were not accustomed to. My teacher at the time displayed utmost confidence in me and that confidence rubbed off on me as I felt confident about myself as a driver as well. It did not mean I was a better driver and I do not believe I was, but my experience trained me to handle those roads and conditions better than their experiences had for them. I was taught to drive safely, confidently, and observantly and evaded many poor drivers and potential accidents as a result. For some, driving clicks immediately after minimal classes/practices/experiences. For others, we cannot deny the importance and evidence of a learning curve.


    With respect to teaching methods, if you are taught to be an inferior and inadequate driver, that's exactly what should be expected. Even after being licensed, if your skills are constantly doubted, it would not be surprising if a driver begins to doubt themselves and exhibits this in their driving habits. If someone is taught by a road rager for instance, it would not be surprising to me if bad drives become a driving habit for them.
     
  13. Shadowhunter

    Shadowhunter Active Member

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    The information I referred to is listed in my first comment under "legit statistics". This information was verified from various sources of international studies and studies from different countries with similar results before deciding to pull each stat from one source. You can check out the sources listed in the bullet point and go through the referred studies and look through your own if you wish. This is what the data I found read. I quoted statements where applicable instead of c&p entire studies or reviews of studies to cut down on the length of the post lol



    With passenger status I can testify to this. When I used to practice driving, I drove across the country at least once a week and clocked many miles. Though I made a personal decision to stop driving, the people I've been around since believe in the "women drivers" stigma and insist on the safety and importance of male drivers. It's been many years since I've driven and I have indeed reverted to passenger status. If I were to drive again I would practice on empty roads before going back out on regular roads in regular conditions. Many women I've been in vehicles with seem quite capable on their own on an almost daily basis, but tend to panic or freeze up and get frustrated or annoyed more easily when there is a male driver in the car. I've often been told by many of them that it makes more sense to let the male driver take the wheel than to listen to the "women driver" criticism before even starting the car, or for minor slip ups that would not be pointed out for their male counterparts.


    In reference to the passing rates, I'll also reiterate an above point. Many people are paying for license now, weather male or female. I was told by two experienced males drivers that they were failed until they came back and agreed to pay a bribe and retake the test, which was then marked as pass before they even started the car in both cases.

    Many young men are taught to drive well before the legal age. The last time I was in a licensing office, I saw many very young men, and many middle age or older women. This may be a factor as well as many women who learn to drive later on may be less confident (two women broke down and cried) and may take lessons past the required amount before taking their test and/or test repeatedly before getting licensed. (Not counting who is paying for license!) I would say you are in the minority of waiting to reach legal age.


    However, all of my references in the OP refer to international and/or foreign national studies and the like. Here are some local, not officially calculated, layman stats.

    My secondary school was once visited by a group to educate us on safe driving practices. Based on students that were willing to answer their questions, 3/4 or more of the young men present had driven a vehicle, were learning to drive, or claimed they could drive. All but one were underage. I was one of two young women that were learning to drive and I was the underage one.

    This means that out of an entire secondary school:

    • only two students were legally on the roads and were learning to drive under legit circumstances.
    • 3/4 or more of the students present were driving on the roads
    • 3/4 or more of the students were illegally driving on the roads, underage
    • out of 3/4 or more of the entire student body, only two of those students driving/practicing were female
    • only one out of more than 3/4 of the student body was a male that was legally on the road

    When asked about this, responses from students to explain this were among the following:

    Female responses:
    • "I will learn to drive when I finish school and get married/ my future husband will teach me."
    • "I don't know if my future husband will want me to drive"
    • "My dad/other relative said driving is not for women/don't want me being mannish and studying car"
    • "Driving and cars is for boys"
    • "Women can't drive"
    • "I am not old enough/it is illegal"
    • "__________ will not let me drive. Why bother learning?"
    • "_______ can drive already/drives me everywhere. Why do I need to learn?"
    • "I 'fraid"


    Male responses:
    • "I is a man. Man does drive."
    • "Once I turn 11/14/other age my dad/brother started teaching me to drive just like he learned at that age."
    • "I real like cars/driving and I want to drive."
    • "When I leave school I better have my license"
    • "Is something you just have to know"


    I will say only one male response was sexist compared to four from the opposite sex. I would argue nearly all of the female excuses were sexist but somewhere out there is a young man waiting for his future spouse to teach him to drive, is afraid of driving, or is concerned about whether he is of legal age or not; just as there is a parent, sibling, or friend teaching a young woman to drive at the same tender age they learned, and young female car enthusiasts eagerly awaiting their next lesson.

    As with other topics, I believe these mentalities are taught. Some drivers assume their years of driving guarantees a pass with a gender or other confidence boost. Others practice over and over again and take as many lessons as they need to convince themselves they are ready. I won't consider those paying for licenses here. These responses are from young secondary school students, only two of which were legally on the road. What do you think we as adults are thinking on the roads with our classifications of either "bad drivers" or "women drivers"? Not hard to see how this is learned and subconsciously taught IMHO.
     
  14. grimreaper009

    grimreaper009 Moderator
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    Shawdow gets what the experience is lol
     
  15. nirtime

    nirtime Active Member

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    OK that's better, was wondering about the sources. Honestly id have to say if the stats are true then something major is wrong locally since people who learn to drive underage tend to be more accustom.

    Also experience in that context makes a lot more sense. everytime the talk about experience comes up its usually people and their 1000 years of driving which I always had to break apart so forgive my perception as Grim did allude to a certain number being almost nothing which for driving locally can be a lot or a little depending on the experiences had which have been a lot for me as every drive has been with major bad drive in which most have threatened my life while driving defensively.
     
  16. Shadowhunter

    Shadowhunter Active Member

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    Those kinds of drivers are why I believe the requirements for licenses need to be higher. If you practice the licensing run enough you will be a pro at it, and many driving schools intentionally let their students practice the exam route so they will pass the exam. What then, of those who ace the driving exam due to their familiarity and experience on the route, but exhibit very poor driving skills in other untested conditions? I know many drivers that maneuver our dreadful South roads like total bosses but are terrified of highways for example, and vice versa. I would be quite curious about current local stats in relation to the ones I listed in the OP though, and would not be opposed to surveys on licensing offices and driving schools.
     
  17. nirtime

    nirtime Active Member

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    Yes honestly I am concerned about our local stats too. When I went for my license I visited License office many times and majority of times young girls were waiting to collect their licenses more than boys.

    Also I did manual and there were mostly girls practicing with me, some of which drove far better than the few boys who were practicing.

    Thats why I rebutted the stats, I saw differently and im aware those are American stats.

    All the same though if everyone practiced properly we would not have these problems.
     
  18. Shadowhunter

    Shadowhunter Active Member

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    The stats on my list were a combo of American, European, U.K., Canadian, and International stats as the sources will show you. The sources reflected generally the same info so I felt safe pinpointing stats from different global sources to address general global stereotypes for a simple forum post.


    I'm quite curious as well since South reflected opposite experiences for me and others I know as well. I also agree that if practices were done properly we would not have these problems. Look at how many licensed drivers have issues regularly coming out of a park or passing other cars on narrow roads. These things should be taken care of in driving practice, and IMO one should not hold a license if they cannot understand such basic driving requirements, including laws on overtaking and speeding, which also leads to accidents.
     
  19. nirtime

    nirtime Active Member

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    Im realising it works differently depending on area. We need local stats, thats what I really am interested in seeing. The only time I recall seeing more boys than girls was when I did regulations. After that it was all opppsing to the stats.
     
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